Month: April 2014

Why Google isn't growing

Why Google isn’t growing

Google CEO Larry Page can be forgiven for being in a bad mood this weekend. On his company’s Q1 2014 earnings call, his people delivered what he thought would be good news: revenues of $15.4 billion, up 19%. Very, very few business can deliver 20% growth on billions in revenues. By any measure, Google is on fire as a company.

 

 

 

Why Google isn't growing

Yet investors hated it.

They sold the stock, and it declined 5% immediately after the call. In 24 hours the price had lost $9, from $544 per share to $536.

Google is growing, for sure. But, counterintuitively, it is not growing at the same time, as the following charts show.

From a macro perspective, Google is boxed in by two factors: The available population on the Internet and the population on the mobile portion of the Internet.

Google – according to numbers from Asymco, the quant-y tech analysts – may not be growing so much as it is merely floating in place on a rising tide of humanity.

Unfortunately for Google, that tide is about to go out.

Internet growth is slowing – and Google is the Internet Google handles about 80% of all search queries, and hundreds of millions of people use Gmail and YouTube, its most famous brands. Google is so dominant that its economics are, in many ways, a proxy for the Web as a whole. How grows the Internet, grows Google.   Read More News>>

Facebook launches optional Nearby Friends feature for Android and iOS

Facebook launches optional Nearby Friends feature for Android and iOS

Facebook today launched Nearby Friends, a new option in the company’s main app for Android and iOS rolling out “over the coming weeks” in the US. The feature lets you see which friends are close to you, assuming that both you and the other party have enabled the functionality first.

Facebook launches optional Nearby Friends feature for Android and iOS

Before we dig in, it’s important to note where in the Facebook app you can access Nearby Friends. You’ll have to tap the “More” icon in the bottom-right corner, and hit “Nearby Friends” located just above “Nearby Places.” If you have already turned the feature on, you can also access it by opening the friends menu by swiping from the right, and you may also see a News Feed story showing you a list of friends nearby.

Opt-in for both parties

When we talked to Facebook product manager Andrea Vaccari, he made a point to emphasize that the feature was entirely optional. Not only is it off by default, but even if you turn it on, you have to still choose what group of friends to share your location with (Friends, Close Friends, or a specific friends list you’ve curated – “Public” and “Friends of Friends” are not available options). On top of that, you and your friend both have to have the feature turned on, and explicitly be sharing with each other, to see each other’s proximity.
nearby friends press 1 Facebook launches optional Nearby Friends feature for Android and iOS
We say “proximity” because Vaccari used the terminology to emphasize what you see once you’ve flipped the switch: the feature shows “not where they are, but whether they are close.” Notice in the right-hand screenshot below that Vaccari’s friends are listed by distance. Where they actually are, aside from “Near San Francisco, CA” and “Near Menlo Park, CA” is not shown.
nearby friends press 3 Facebook launches optional Nearby Friends feature for Android and iOS
This is in the “Nearby” section but the next two are also interesting: Traveling shows you who is on the go and Elsewhere shows you which of your friends are in a different part of the world. If a friend is far from you, you’ll get less specific information (like the city or country). If they are closer, you may see more (like the neighborhood). Read More News>>