Month: January 2014

New mobile app to track train schedules on a real-time basis

New mobile app to track train schedules on a real-time basis

Railway officials claim a new mobile app will allow commuters to track train time, expected arrival time, platform number and the following train; app likely to be launched in six months

Joining the bandwagon of enterprises launching user-friendly applications or apps for mobile phones, the Indian Railways has decide to launch an app that will help commuters track train schedules on a real-time basis.
This application will allow commuters to track their train even as it is approaching the railway station. It would show the train time, expected arrival time, platform number and the following train. The app is likely to be launched for public use in the next six months,” said a senior railway official.

Apart from keeping a tab on train schedules, commuters can purchase local train tickets using this app. Once a person is near a railway station, he or she can type the code of the station they are headed for. The commuter will immediately receive a message or an e-ticket, once the payment is made through internet banking.

The authorities said they were working on a solution to prevent the message or e-ticket from being copied or forwarded. They were also trying to figure out ways to ensure that the phone does not switch hands after booking tickets. Read More News>>

Revenue and profit rise at Google, but mobile is a persistent challenge

Revenue and profit rise at Google, but mobile is a persistent challenge

here is no denying that Google has become a mobile company. Now, Google – along with shareholders, industry partners and advertisers – is trying to figure out what that means.

In mobile advertising, Google is wrestling with how to make as much money on phones as it has on the ads that appear on desktop computers. Its fourth-quarter earnings report Thursday showed that it is continuing to struggle with lower ad prices on phones. Yet some of the new types of ads it has introduced have paid off handsomely, as have mobile businesses like the Play store for Android devices.
In mobile advertising, Google is wrestling with how to make as much money on phones as it has on the ads that appear on desktop computers.But in other areas, like manufacturing smartphones, Google has decided that the business is better left to someone else. On Wednesday, it announced that it would sell Motorola Mobility, which it bought less than two years ago for $12.5 billion, to Lenovo for $2.91 billion. Motorola’s $384 million loss in the fourth quarter contributed to Google’s failure to meet analysts’ earnings expectations for the quarter.

Google executives would prefer that people stop talking about mobile at all.

“People aren’t distinguishing what they’re doing on different screens, so advertisers should be more agnostic about where they reach the user,” Nikesh Arora, Google’s chief business officer, said on a conference call with analysts. “The fundamental tenet is not to speak about mobile, mobile, mobile. It’s really about living with the users. What device are you on? What’s your question? How can we assist you? That’s a much broader and richer set of activities for us.” Read More News>>

How YouTube and Twitter Ruined Super Bowl Commercials

How YouTube and Twitter Ruined Super Bowl Commercials

In a few days, the largest television audience it is now possible to assemble will see a new ad for Oikos Greek yogurt. The stakes couldn’t be higher: Getting in front of more than 100 million viewers for 30 seconds costs an estimated $4 million.

How YouTube and Twitter Ruined Super Bowl Commercials
Too bad, then, that the spot has already been branded a disappointment: “A lot of setup without much payoff,” Adweek shrugged earlier this week.

This, in miniature, is what the formerly glorious Super Bowl ad game has come to. If you’re ready for some football, you’ll have to wait until kickoff. But if you’re ready for some advertising, a slew of the most-awaited commercials of the year are available right now.

Thanks to advertisers’ frenzy to exploit the possibilities of social media and YouTube, it’s now possible for the letdown to actually precede the hype.

It’s an epic fumble, really. Everybody knows the Super Bowl is that one special day when Madison Avenue’s finest creations receive unrivaled attention — the one time a year that we all stop pretending we hate advertising. Read More News>>

A Closer Look at Satya Nadella, Possibly the Next CEO of Microsoft

When it comes to name-brand recognition, he’s no Stephen Elop (former CEO of Nokia), Alan Mulally (CEO of Ford) or even Julie Larson-Green (Executive Vice President at Microsoft). The alleged CEO designate of Microsoft, however, is a familiar face in the hallowed halls of Redmond. For those of us not familiar with the innards of Microsoft, though, who is Satya Nadella?
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Late last year, word got out that Nadella’s name was on the software giant’s shortlist of potential replacements for current CEO Steve Ballmer, who announced his resignation back in August. At the time, Nadella was charged with running Microsoft’s cloud computing team. And by most accounts, he’s done a fine job of it, helping to make the company’s Windows Azure offering a major force in business cloud computing.

This Business Insider article from December portrays Nadella as something of a company man, a notable contrast from Ballmer’s much publicized heart-on-his-sleeve (and screaming from his diaphragm) business style. The impression of the executive, largely unknown outside the industry, was pulled from a video interview with Om Malik. The conversation features an enthusiastic Nadella attempting to forecast what the tech world will look like in a decade—a farsightedness that’s been hard to spot in much of Microsoft management recently. Read More News>>

Web gets new domain addresses like .guru, and .bike

The humble .com is set to receive some competition from a new set of unusual web addresses such as .guru and .singles! Internet users will now be able to register in targeted and specific domains ending in .guru, .bike, .singles, .plumbing and .clothing among others as a US company is offering a wave of new Web addresses.

Donuts Inc will kick off the general availability period for seven new Internet domain names, marking the beginning of a new era for the Internet in which users will have unprecedented choice in how they identify and brand themselves online.

The new generic top-level domains (gTLDs) – the first of hundreds Donuts will launch this year – are .bike, .clothing, .guru, .holdings, .plumbing, .singles, and .ventures, the company said. Anyone can register names in these gTLDs on a first come, first-served basis from accredited registrars worldwide.


Internet users will now be able to register in targeted and specific domains ending in .guru, .bike, .singles, .plumbing and .clothing among others as a US company is offering a wave of new Web addresses.

Donuts Inc will kick off the general availability period for seven new Internet domain names, marking the beginning of a new era for the Internet in which users will have unprecedented choice in how they identify and brand themselves online.

The new generic top-level domains (gTLDs) — the first of hundreds Donuts will launch this year — are .bike, .clothing, .guru, .holdings, .plumbing, .singles, and .ventures, the company said.

Anyone can register names in these gTLDs on a first come, first-served basis from accredited registrars worldwide.

According to the company on February 5, .camera, .equipment, .estate, .gallery, .graphics, .lighting and .photography will be open for registration by anyone interested in an online identity connected to these terms.

“Starting this week, new, relevant and specific Internet naming options will be available on a scale never before seen,” Donuts co-founder and CEO Paul Stahura said.

“This is a unique opportunity for businesses, brands, organisations, and individuals to find an online identity that speaks precisely to their products, services and interests,” Stahura said. Read More News>>

Matt Cutts: Facebook, Twitter Social Signals Not Part of Google Search Ranking Algorithms

There has been much speculation and misinformation in recent years about whether social signals from

Matt Cutts, the head of Google’s webspam team, tackled the subject in his latest webmaster help video, which asks whether Facebook and Twitter signals are part of the ranking algorithm, and how much they matter.

With all the speculation, this is definitely an interesting topic for Cutts to address. Here’s what Cutts had to say:

Facebook and Twitter factor into Google search algorithm, and if so, how much. While some SEO professionals focus on social media for the rankings potential, others strictly look at social for the traffic, awareness, and other indirect benefits.

Facebook and Twitter pages are treated like any other pages in our web index so if something occurs on Twitter or occurs on Facebook and we’re able to crawl it, then we can return that in our search results. But as far as doing special specific work to sort of say “you have this many followers on Twitter or this many likes on Facebook”, to the best of my knowledge we don’t currently have any signals like that in our web search ranking algorithms.

Cutts statement seems quite definitivie that no, those signals aren’t taken into account. Does this mean there is some tiny bit of influence that could possibly be taking place? Is it something that could be changing later this year? Considering Cutts always chooses his words very carefully in these videos, it’s an interesting (and perhaps telling) thing to say. Read More Article>>

Google Buys A.I. Company for Search, Not Robots

“I’d like to go on a vacation somewhere warm over the summer, but only have a budget of $1,000. Where should I go?”

If you search Google with a very long and human question like this, you will see a series of strange links to articles like, “7 Frugal Habits Everyone Should Develop,” “Successful People Who Prove You Should Use Your Vacation Time,” and “How to Plan a Vacation.”
                                   
Google wants to change that, which is why the company bought the British artificial intelligence developer, DeepMind, on Monday.

Some in the blogosphere saw the acquisition differently, speculating that Google was buying DeepMind to help make robots and thermostats more intelligent — presumably for world domination.

While this new artificial intelligence technology could be used with robots one day, possibly even in the not-too-distant future, for now, Google was hoping to continue its world domination of search.

This is why Facebook was also competing to buy DeepMind, as The Information noted Monday. Facebook doesn’t have any humanoid robots, robotic dogs or Internet-connected thermostats. What Facebook does have is something that Google dominates: search.

ReCode first reported the deal on Sunday, saying Google had agreed to pay $400 million for the company.

People who work with Google but could not be named because they were not allowed to speak publicly for the company, said the acquisition of the artificial intelligence software had nothing to do with robots, but everything to do with semantic technology and the ability to understand what people were asking for online and answer in a very human way.

While a Google spokesman confirmed the purchase of DeepMind, he declined to comment about why Google had acquired the company or the type of projects the new team of researchers and scientists would be working on. Read More News>>

Big Profit at Facebook as It Tilts to Mobile

Ten years after its founding as a simple website for a few thousand Harvard undergraduates to manage their social lives, Facebook is a far different company.

About 757 million people around the world used the social network on an average day last month, and three-quarters of them logged on using mobile devices.
                                      
Facebook’s business has also been transformed. In 2012, most of its money came from generic banner ads delivered to users visiting its site by desktop computer. In the fourth quarter of 2013, 53 percent of the company’s advertising revenue came from pitches delivered to iPads, smartphones and other mobile devices, with many of those ads highly targeted by gender, age and other demographics.

“I think it’s inarguable that Facebook is a mobile-first company,” Facebook’s chief financial officer, David Ebersman, said in an interview.

The ascendance of mobile, both in use of the site and advertising, was apparent in Facebook’s strong fourth-quarter financial results, which the company reported on Wednesday.

Facebook had total revenue of $2.59 billion in the quarter that ended Dec. 31, up from $1.59 billion in the same quarter a year ago. Revenue from advertising was $2.34 billion, up 76 percent from the previous year. Read More News>>

President Obama wants to create six new technology hubs across the US

President Obama is aiming to increase America’s focus on technology and startups after revealing his ambition to create six new tech hubs across the US, CNET reports.
                                     
The proposal, which was made during the President’s State of the Union address this evening, aims to build on two existing hubs — located in Raleigh, North Carolina, and Youngstown, Ohio — which Obama says have “connected businesses to research universities that can help America lead the world in advanced technologies.”

“We… have the chance, right now, to beat other countries in the race for the next wave of high-tech manufacturing jobs,” the President said. He did not disclose more details of the proposed new hubs, though we’ll know more as and when a proposal is put to Congress.

Apple gained considerable attention when it moved some part of its manufacturing process for Macs back to the US. Google-owned Motorola went a step further by producing its new Moto devices entirely in US — an angle that it has been keen to push to consumers.

5 Questions to Ask During Your Job Interview

It’s easy to feel like you’re in the hot seat during a job interview — you really want the position, you’re battling all sorts of jitters and it certainly doesn’t help that the stern executive sitting in front of you looks like he could use another cup of coffee
                              
What often gets lost in the interview process, however, is a dialogue between job seekers and prospective employers, rather than a one-way Q&A. Instead of letting the interviewer ask all the questions, you should find the appropriate time to ask more about the position, the company and the industry. Read More>>